Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Character Book

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Character Book

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Character BookHello and happy Saturday. It’s been a while since I last shared a TpT product with you, or at least it feels that way. It’s weird because when I’m working I get the most inspiration for new resources to create, but at the same time, that’s when I have the least energy and time. I’m not making excuses, I promise.

Today I bring you a product that I had a lot of fun making because it’s about a world I’ve always been fascinated with. I’m talking about Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. As much as I loved this universe, I hadn’t read the book until recently, and when I did I decided it would be great material for a resource.

My Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland character book is exactly that, the template for students to fill out information about every character in the story. Students will write the description as well as make a drawing of the characters. They can work on this as an individual project, in groups, or even the entire class, each student focusing on one page.

I hope that you find this product useful for your lessons, and if you do get it, let me know what you thought about it in the comments below.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

 

The Empowered Woman’s Starter Kit

The Empowered Woman’s Starter Kit

 

The Empowered Woman's Starter Kit Cover .jpg

Hello and happy Sunday. I’m very excited to finally be able to share my new TpT product with you because it’d been my baby for over a year and now you can get it and use it.

The Empowered Woman’s Starter Kit was thought as a guide for teachers who want to introduce their students to feminism but don’t know where to start. It includes suggested readings, TED Talks, songs, and poems around different topics related to feminism, but most importantly, it has reflection questions I have designed in order to help young people learn about feminism and become agents of change in our society.

Like all my products, you can use this in the way that you consider it fitter for you and your students. I designed it to look like a handbook so you can print copies and give each one for your students, or you can have one for yourself, and adapt it in a way that best suits you. Due to copyright issues, the original sources are not included, but they are all available online and links to them are provided.

This is just the beginning in a series of works related to feminism that I am going to make available to you. In the meantime, share with me your questions about feminism in the comments.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

 

‘Looking for Alaska’ Discussion Questions

‘Looking for Alaska’ Discussion Questions

Looking for Alaska Cover Design.jpg

Hello and happy Sunday. A few months ago, when my brief time as a high school teacher was ending, I was given the list of assigned readings for the following year and saw that ninth graders would have to read Looking for Alaska by John Green. Now, if you’ve followed this blog for a while, more specifically  the bookish posts, then you know that I’ve read John Green’s books and collaborations before and that I really like his style. That being said, given that I was teaching English language learners, I wasn’t sure how much they would actually understand and enjoy from studying a John Green novel at school.

was a bit conflicted about the choice the school had made because, like I said, at a personal level, I’ve really enjoyed John Green’s books, but as a teacher I didn’t know if Looking for Alaska was a good fit for ninth graders with an intermediate level of English. Then again, the reader in me was curious to explore this novel, so I decided to give it a chance and in a way “test” how much I could profit from it at a pedagogical level, if that makes any sense. 

It was clear to me that a traditional novel study like the ones I’ve done before wouldn’t work for a novel like Looking for Alaska. I thought that by doing that, the true essence of the author’s writing would get lost and students were just going to approach the novel in an “academic” way. I decided, though, to approach this novel in a more relaxed, conversational way, and that led me to creating a set of Discussion Questions. 

I like to think of this resource as a companion to the novel; I want teachers to consult it as they read the book in preparation for their classes. I want them to annotate the book and to insert the questions as they’re reading, so that they can be asked in class at the appropriate moments. To me, what this product will do is help both the teacher and the students to study the novel by talking about it, rather than through quizzes or, like I said, more traditional resources, which I’ve also created for other books. 

As always, if you get this product and use it in your lessons, let me know what you did and especially what you thought about it. Also, if you have any requests for studies or any other type of resource I could create around a book or a movie, tell me about them in the comments.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

Estudio del libro ‘Todo va a estar bien’

Estudio del libro ‘Todo va a estar bien’

Hola y feliz sábado. Si leen mi blog con regularidad, saben que Teachers Pay Teachers es uno de mis lugares favoritos para encontrar materiales para mis clases. Como enseño inglés y esta página originalmente es de Estados Unidos, la mayoría de recursos son en este idioma. Sin embargo, como hablante de español me doy cuenta que hacen falta muchísimos productos que puedan ayudar a docentes que enseñen en este idioma, o que no estén en el contexto estadounidense, sino que, como yo, trabajan en América Latina u otros países de habla hispana.

Es por esta razón que además de los productos en inglés que desarrollo y que vendo en mi tienda de Teachers Pay Teachers, ocasionalmente incluyo material en español, sobre todo estudios de libros. Mi propósito con esto es brindar más opciones de recursos que los profesores pueden utilizar en sus clases, pero también visibilizar autores, sobre todo los colombianos, para que sus libros sean leídos en otros países.

Todo va a estar bien es el primer libro que Ricardo Silva Romero ha escrito para niños, o por lo menos el primer libro del que yo sé. Es una historia de viaje, de aventuras, de lo que significa realmente querer a alguien, y de las decisiones que implica este amor, aunque puedan no traernos felicidad. Es una historia de un psicólogo de perros y de una niña genio que se unen y se acompañan en la búsqueda de un ovejero con ansiedad que siente que ya no puede seguir viviendo como una mascota.

Haciendo click aquí pueden acceder al estudio de libro que desarrollé, que trae preguntas de comprensión y de reflexión para discutir y responder mientras se lee. Considero que este sería el libro perfecto para leer y estudiar en cuarto y quinto de primaria, pero ustedes pueden mirar el recurso y juzgar si es apto para otras edades u otros grados.

Como siempre, los invito a que me den sugerencias sobre otros productos para desarrollar y vender, sean en español o en inglés.

¡Feliz sábado!

Con amor, Miss Camila

The BFG Study Pack

The BFG Study Pack

TpT Cover Design.jpg

Hello and happy Saturday. I finally read The BFG by Roald Dahl and I’m super excited to share with you all the resources I made so that you can study this novel in class with your kids. I don’t know about you, but I feel that books like this are meant to be in the classroom, with kids doing funny voices and sound effects, and there’s so much to do with it.

As usual, I created a novel study. I think of this as a booklet that you can download, print, and give your students to develop in class as you read. The questions and other exercises were made thinking about elementary students, and the limited time you might have in your classroom to work with this resource.

If you feel like you probably won’t be using all the questions or that a whole novel study with spaces to record answers is too much, especially for larger classrooms, then you can get the question list. I think that is going to give teachers more flexibility to study the book. You can just select a few questions, or use them as prompts to elicit writing or speaking. You can quiz your students with one question…it’s up to you. The questions are the same as the ones in the novel study, so you don’t need both resources.

There is a movie version of The BFG, and maybe you want to watch it with your class and do something “academic” afterwards. You can get the movie study as well and take advantage of the learning opportunities of watching movies in class.

Now, if you don’t want to do traditional book studies but you still want to work on the novel, you can get Talk Like a Giant. It is a glossary with “giant” words from each chapter of the book. The idea is that students write the definition in their own words, or a sentence using the word, and that they make a drawing. I think this is a fun way to work on writing skills and fluency.

If everything I just listed sounded awesome and you want it all, you can get the study pack. You get all the resources I’ve explained for a discount price. That means that you’ll pay less than if you got them separately.

As always, if you download any of these products, send me a message and let me know how you used them in your classroom. In the comments below tell me about other products you’d like to see in my TpT store.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

“Living on One Dollar” Discussion Questions

“Living on One Dollar” Discussion Questions

100th day.png

Hello and happy Saturday. When I started my brief period as a high school teacher I was struggling to get ideas for lessons. The academic term was already over so basically all the topics had been already covered by another teacher, there were no graded assignments, but there was still what felt to me like a long time before term tests and then the beginning of the new term.

It’s no secret that Netflix has become a teacher’s best friend when it comes to situations like the one I just described, especially when you have the app and you can just download the movies or documentaries you want to watch in class without the need to rely on internet access. But, hey, I wasn’t just going to play whatever and call it a day, so I actually looked for a documentary my students and I would find interesting and I would follow up said documentary with some discussion questions.

That’s how my TpT product, “Living On One Dollar” Discussion Questions came to life. I specifically used these questions to assess my students’ speaking skills, but you can set up a round-table kind of dynamic and ask questions for students to start a conversation on those topics. You can use them as writing prompt or even as the bases for bigger projects.

I was honestly surprised at some of the answers my students gave to me, and I learned things about them I wouldn’t have imagined in a million years, like the fact that they engage in social work and help underprivileged communities. If maybe you’re interested in the documentary, for teaching purposes or for personal ones, but you don’t have Netflix or aren’t sure if you want to watch it yet, you can click here and watch the trailer. And if you end up downloading my product and using it for your classes, let me know how everything went.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

Teacher Binder Essentials

Teacher Binder Essentials

TpT Cover Design.jpg

Hello and happy Saturday. A few weeks ago, I posted about my new teacher notebook and how it has everything I can possibly need. I’ve used it for almost a month now in my new job and it is pretty awesome, but I know fancy notebooks like that one are expensive and not everyone wants to spend a ton of money on them. I also know that a notebook is not convenient for all teachers, and that some of us prefer a binder that we can customize.

In today’s post I bring you a little something to help you with your teacher binder. It’s literally an essentials pack, so you don’t have to sort through a bunch of formats just to select what you really consider necessary. You can check out the resource here .

Last year, I had a binder I put together both with free resources I found online and my own formats, that is, formats I created, which helped me be more organized in my job. I decided to share them with you and I really hope that you find them useful.

What do you get in this resource? You get both monthly and weekly planners. I personally use the monthly planners to write down school-wide events or deadlines I have, and the weekly planner for my own lessons. I also added weekends because I know that teachers have to go to school at least a Saturday or two a year, and that must go in the binder as well. I included a checklist, and if you’re like me, you never have enough of those, so know you can get as many copies of it as needed.

I’m a planner, so we all know I need to see the big picture, which means that monthly and weekly planners will only do as much. For that reason, I designed a yearly planning format. That’s what saved my sanity when I transitioned from my first to my second year as a teacher. Basically, during my first year, I would write down everything we did in class after it was over, and then I revised and rearranged that information, which is what I used to plan the following year. Using this format helped me reflect on what I’d done in class, and it served as a tool to improve the following year, but it was also a time saver in the sense that I already had the plan of what I was supposed to do, I just needed to make it more concrete.

I honestly hope that you find these formats useful. In the comments, let me know what you prefer to use for planning and keeping organized at work.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila