The BFG Study Pack

The BFG Study Pack

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Hello and happy Saturday. I finally read The BFG by Roald Dahl and I’m super excited to share with you all the resources I made so that you can study this novel in class with your kids. I don’t know about you, but I feel that books like this are meant to be in the classroom, with kids doing funny voices and sound effects, and there’s so much to do with it.

As usual, I created a novel study. I think of this as a booklet that you can download, print, and give your students to develop in class as you read. The questions and other exercises were made thinking about elementary students, and the limited time you might have in your classroom to work with this resource.

If you feel like you probably won’t be using all the questions or that a whole novel study with spaces to record answers is too much, especially for larger classrooms, then you can get the question list. I think that is going to give teachers more flexibility to study the book. You can just select a few questions, or use them as prompts to elicit writing or speaking. You can quiz your students with one question…it’s up to you. The questions are the same as the ones in the novel study, so you don’t need both resources.

There is a movie version of The BFG, and maybe you want to watch it with your class and do something “academic” afterwards. You can get the movie study as well and take advantage of the learning opportunities of watching movies in class.

Now, if you don’t want to do traditional book studies but you still want to work on the novel, you can get Talk Like a Giant. It is a glossary with “giant” words from each chapter of the book. The idea is that students write the definition in their own words, or a sentence using the word, and that they make a drawing. I think this is a fun way to work on writing skills and fluency.

If everything I just listed sounded awesome and you want it all, you can get the study pack. You get all the resources I’ve explained for a discount price. That means that you’ll pay less than if you got them separately.

As always, if you download any of these products, send me a message and let me know how you used them in your classroom. In the comments below tell me about other products you’d like to see in my TpT store.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

Does This Count As PD?

Does This Count As PD?

Hello and happy Saturday. If you’re a teacher, then you know what PD is, and you’ve probably suffered through it, too. PD stands for “professional development,” and in my short experience as a teacher, it’s always sucked. What’s sad is the fact that I’m always looking for courses to enroll in and articles to read, all related to teaching, and I would love to attend one of those life-changing conferences lucky teachers can go to, as opposed to the conferences I have to attend for work.

I’ve recently discovered the wonder of reading books related to teaching, and that’s how I came across 32 Third Graders and One Class Bunny by Phillip Done. I actually enjoyed it so much, I decided to make it the subject of my very first post in this series I’m calling “Does This Count as PD?” because, you know, there are books I feel like every teacher HAS to read.

I listened to the audiobook version because, well, multitasking, and I loved the fact that Phillip Done, the author, is also the narrator. That makes the listening experience all the more real and cute. I’m just going to say this: I adored the entire book, but especially the first chapter. To me, it was fantastic, and it summarized what being a teacher is about in the best way possible.

The book is funny, but in a respectful way. I’m not sure how many non-teachers have read this book, but I think 100% of the jokes are funny to teachers, mainly because we can relate to literally everything the author says. Now that I’m no longer a newbie teacher, I realize that this book would be great for people who are starting out. It’s not a handbook, though, it’s a series of anecdotes related to teaching, and I really wish I could have read it during my first year. Maybe it would have made it better.

I only have good things to say about this book, and I especially loved how relatable it is. I swear, at times I felt like the author was talking about my own students. If you’re a teacher or you plan to become one, do yourself a favor and read this book. Also, let me know in the comments if there’s a book you’ve read that you feel everybody should, too.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila