How I Use My Magical Monthly Reading Planner

How I Use My Magical Monthly Reading Planner

Hello and happy Wednesday. I am super excited to share this post with you because I love being able to help new book bloggers and reviewers whenever I can. Today I would like to tell you how I keep my blogging life organized by using the Magical Monthly Reading Planner I got in an Owlcrate a few months ago.

The first thing you’ll notice is that, yes, I put sticky tabs because I am constantly moving back and forth and writing stuff, and I need everything to be easily located.

 

 

Here we have where most of the magic happens: the monthly planner. I didn’t start using this on January 1st, so it actually begins way later. I also don’t use a specific set of pages for a month and then move to the next one, I prefer to continue on the same page because it gives me a clearer vision of my immediate blogging future.

Like I said once when I was talking about how I keep organized, I prefer a horizontal view rather than a vertical one, so monthly planners work better for me than weekly planners do. This notebook has both, but I’m not currently using the weekly planner pages. The way I plan is pretty straightforward: I write down the ideas for the day when I want to write the post and I highlight them when said post has been written. If for some reason I can’t write them that day, I’ll just scratch them off, and draw a cute little arrow or an asterisk. The horizontal disposition is also helpful for this because it helps things still look organized even after I’ve made alterations.

We then have a page which originally was titled New Releases This Month, but I couldn’t care any less about that, so instead it’s my physical TBR list. I have a column for books in English and one for books in Spanish, and the reason why I have it is that when I go on trips I prefer to take a physical book and this is a practical way to find one to take with me.

 

 

 

 

 

Because my reading paces vary so much depending on my mood and my job situation, I don’t really need a Monthly TBR list, so instead I have this chart so that I can expand on post ideas. Basically, I write the post title and then I jot down key points so that I know where I wanted to go when I originally came up with the post. This is especially helpful for content that is very long or specific, or that I feel that I can easily lose the focus of if I don’t have a guideline.

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Finally, we have the Book Review Section. Again, I keep one page for books in Spanish, and the other one for books in English. Personally, this format has helped me organize my thoughts when I’m writing reviews. It’s way more concise than what I was used to, and so far I’m very happy with it.

Whether you have a planner like this one or not, the contents of it can be useful for you, especially if you’re getting started as a book blogger or reviewer. To me, it’s been key to have everything in one place, sitting on my desk so that all I have to do is consult it whenever I need it. If you’re a blogger as well, I would love to know about your tips and tricks to be organized. Tell me about them in the comments below.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

 

 

 

 

Teacher Binder Essentials

Teacher Binder Essentials

TpT Cover Design.jpg

Hello and happy Saturday. A few weeks ago, I posted about my new teacher notebook and how it has everything I can possibly need. I’ve used it for almost a month now in my new job and it is pretty awesome, but I know fancy notebooks like that one are expensive and not everyone wants to spend a ton of money on them. I also know that a notebook is not convenient for all teachers, and that some of us prefer a binder that we can customize.

In today’s post I bring you a little something to help you with your teacher binder. It’s literally an essentials pack, so you don’t have to sort through a bunch of formats just to select what you really consider necessary. You can check out the resource here .

Last year, I had a binder I put together both with free resources I found online and my own formats, that is, formats I created, which helped me be more organized in my job. I decided to share them with you and I really hope that you find them useful.

What do you get in this resource? You get both monthly and weekly planners. I personally use the monthly planners to write down school-wide events or deadlines I have, and the weekly planner for my own lessons. I also added weekends because I know that teachers have to go to school at least a Saturday or two a year, and that must go in the binder as well. I included a checklist, and if you’re like me, you never have enough of those, so know you can get as many copies of it as needed.

I’m a planner, so we all know I need to see the big picture, which means that monthly and weekly planners will only do as much. For that reason, I designed a yearly planning format. That’s what saved my sanity when I transitioned from my first to my second year as a teacher. Basically, during my first year, I would write down everything we did in class after it was over, and then I revised and rearranged that information, which is what I used to plan the following year. Using this format helped me reflect on what I’d done in class, and it served as a tool to improve the following year, but it was also a time saver in the sense that I already had the plan of what I was supposed to do, I just needed to make it more concrete.

I honestly hope that you find these formats useful. In the comments, let me know what you prefer to use for planning and keeping organized at work.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

My New Teacher Notebook

My New Teacher Notebook

Lovely Wholesale

Hello and happy Saturday. Yes, today I actually have a teaching-related post like we used to have every Saturday way back when. I wanted to share with you the teacher notebook I bought in Spain, which I got for about $22. Now, I know we’re all good people here and none of you would think about doing anything with the pictures of the inside of my notebook, but sadly there are people who might use the pictures to “create” and sell their own teacher notebooks, and that’s something I don’t want to risk. For that reason, I’ll just describe to you what the notebook has and you’ll have to rely on your imagination to picture it. Let’s get started, shall we?

When you open the notebook you have calendars for the 2017-2018, 2019-2019, and 2019-2020 school years. That itself is awesome because it means this can be used throughout the years. Then there is a cardboard cover and the actual “notebook” begins. You have a page to fill in your contact information, and then some blank pages. What I love about this is that every section has written “instructions” of ways in which you can use it. For example: the first two blank pages say “use this pages to past documents and information of your school, or for free notes,” and the second set of blank pages says “use this pages to glue the class calendar.

You then get a section of blank schedules to fill out, and I love the fact that they include Saturdays and Sundays. The next section was game-changing to me because its designed for you to draw your class blueprints. I would laminate that part and use either whiteboard markers or stickers to make that section reusable, but I think it’s genius when you’re thinking about how to place your students (you know I’m all for assigned seating).

There’s a section for you to add meetings, parent conferences, and school activities, which it’s divided by months, so it comes in really handy, especially when you’re doing your yearly planning. You get some blank checklists, and there are enough for the entire year, so if you organize your to-do’s into short and long term, this will be great for you. There is more space for you to jot down ideas and projects you might have, and at the end of this first section, there’s a birthday page.

Then comes the planning section. You first get a monthly planner, which is basically like an empty calendar. Then there’s another thing that sold me on this notebook and it’s the weekly planner. I love it because you get the entire week in a single page, and that is important for me because it allows me to see the “big picture” of my classes. There’s enough space to be somewhat detailed about the planning, and that’s also important for me. This weekly planner obviously takes up a big portion of the notebook.

We then have the list section, so basically there are many blank lists waiting to be filled with grades and check-marks. I personally used to struggle with the list thing because I felt that the ones I’d downloaded didn’t have enough space for grades or assignments and so I found myself having to print new ones over and over. Here you’re covered for a long time, trust me.

Another really cool section is about the students, so for example you get lists to fill with their parents’ contact information, other data and observations. I used to work at a school where parents were super involved, so it was common to meet with them regularly, and having a chart like this one comes in super handy. Then on the flip side of the information page, there are attendance lists. I think especially for homeroom teachers it is key to check attendance. Also, if you know when a student was absent, you can help them catch up because you know the exact day.

There’s also a meeting planner, which again, comes in super handy when registering one’s interactions with parents. I think that teachers nowadays have to be extremely organized, and that also includes recording any data that might be important. In this same section, there is space to write information about students and possible meetings.

The final section has a set of lined paper to take notes on meetings, and then some pages where you can write links and other contact information. There are also some plastic pockets at the end, and other cardboard pieces to use as bookmarks or separators or whatever.

I think you get the idea of why I fell in love with my teacher notebook. In the comments below let me know the kind of organizer or planner you use at work.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

Updated Multi-Class Weekly Planner

Updated Multi-Class Weekly Planner

TpT Cover Design.jpgHello and happy Saturday. I think I’ve told you before that I teach different subjects in different grades, which means I need to be super organized with my planning so that I don’t go crazy.

I am a planner, both in my personal and in my professional life, and that means that before each week starts, I have to write down what I’m doing each day. In my post on how I keep organized, and then in my update, you can see that I tried a format for weekly lesson planning, which I complemented with color-coding so that I could easily find each class and know what I had to do.

The system worked for me for a few months, but I wasn’t in love with the design of the planner. You see, the full pages only held two or three days each, so I had to constantly flip through pages, which is annoying, and I felt that there was a lot of extra space I was wasting because there were eight slots per column, but I was only using five.

I felt like I could work better with a simpler template, and that’s when I decided that instead of looking through the perfect planner on Pinterest to print and download, I could come up with my own. Basically, I needed a chart with the days of the week on the top row, and the names of each of my classes on the left-side column. I still color-code because that way it’s even easier for me to spot a class and see what I have to do.

I fill out my planner by hand, and it serves two purposes for me: one, if I look at each column, I can see my full day of classes; and two, if I see each row, I’m looking at a week’s worth of lessons for each of my classes. I find that filling this planner is way easier, and I’m also saving paper because I’m using one sheet at a time as opposed to one.

You can get this template for free by clicking here. If you use it, let me know how you liked it. Remember that I’m always creating new resources and putting them in my TpT store, so be sure to check it out.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

My Teacher Planner (An Update)

My Teacher Planner (An Update)

 

Hello and happy Saturday. A few months ago I wrote a post on the teacher planner I’d use for the new school year. Now, in that post I talked about where I got it and all those details, so if you want to know more, click here. In this post I’ll be talking about how I’ve been actually using the planner throughout the school year. Let’s get started, shall we?

What we first see here is my yearly planning. I made it based on last year, but as you can see, it now has some notes I wrote in pencil, and post-its. I add them whenever I want to modify something from the “original” plan, so that at the end of the year I can have an updated, more complete yearly plan.

I’m in charge of uploading a more detailed planning of my classes with Pre-K and Transition every two weeks, and that’s when the yearly plan comes in super handy. For Kindergarten, however, there’s another teacher in charge, so while she uploads the planning, I write my ideas for the classes in a lined paper, to then complement with what she uploaded.

 

 

 

 

 

This is my weekly planner, and probably the most important part of everything I’m showing you. I color-code it so that it’s easier for me to know what I have to do with each grade. Here I only write keywords or the general idea of my lesson. On the “notes” section, I add any ideas that come to mind, lessons that I had to postpone or homework that needs to be sent.

 

 

 

 

Finally, right before the school year started, I added these monthly planners, which you can find at Playdough to Plato as part of the free pack where I got the other forms. I use this for two things: one, in colors I add important events happening each day (maybe a visit to the library, a meeting with a parent, or a special theme day). Because I can see the full month, it’s easy for me to use that information when I’m doing my two-week planning. Now, the other thing I use it for, is to document what I did in each class at the end of the day. I do this so that I can add that information to the yearly planning and make my life a little easier each year.

Do you use a planner for work? If so, how do you use it?

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

 

 

 

My Teacher Planner

My Teacher Planner

Hello and happy Saturday. Planning is a very important part of my job as a teacher, one that is sometimes boring, which is why I try to get work done ahead of time so I don’t have to worry about it later.  Last year I had a huge notebook as my teacher planner, but I found it to be impractical, so this year I decided to go use a binder. In today’s post I’ll share with you what’s inside of my planner. Let’s get started, shall we?

The first page you see there is actually my yearly planning for Pre-K. I have one for each grade I teach. What I did was take all the information I’d gathered throughout the previous year of school and then I arranged it in a chart. Basically what I have now is a list of every topic I worked on with each of my classes and the different activities we did. This will help me have a clear idea of how to plan my classes this year, given that in my school we make lesson plans every two weeks. I have this printed version I can highlight and add post it notes and scratch or whatever I need to do, and a digital version, which I’ll edit based on the changes I make throughout the year.

Now, I have to upload my lesson plans once every two weeks. The lesson plans are really simple and it takes no time to do them. They’re digital, however, and the format is not very friendly for a teacher who’s on the run most of the day, so what I’m using this year are the weekly planning templates from Playdough to Plato. The whole pack of planners, checklists, templates, and other planner essentials is completely free, and so are the other forms I’ll show you in this post.

I love this weekly planner because it’s super spacious and in the following page you have a section where you can take notes or add reminders so that you take them into account the following week.

I have not one but two grade books, one from Teacher Created Resources, and the other one, a total cutie my best friend gave me. The thing is, having a notebook or a binder and a grade book is the opposite of practical, really, so I decided to take them back home this year and use them some other time, maybe when I get my own classroom and don’t have to be running around everywhere.

This checklist template is from A Modern Teacher, and I love it because I get enough space to write the activity type I’m grading without everything looking crammed. The date section is also helpful because that way I can keep track of students who were absent that day or didn’t hand in a homework on time.

Speaking of missing homework, I’m going to start using the I Didn’t Do My Homework log I found on Pinterest. I’m going to use it with my older kids because I feel that way they can become more responsible for their own work. Last year I had a bit of trouble with grades because some students didn’t hand in their work, so now whenever I have a blank space in my checklist, I’ll approach the student, and if they don’t have the homework, I’ll write their name in the log. This way I can know who owes me stuff.

Once the classes start, I’m sure I’ll be adding more pages to this planner and I’ll keep you updated. I will, for example, add a monthly planner at the beginning so that I have important school-related dates in mind.

What are you using for a planner this year? Let me know!

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila