My Pinterest “Book Lists” Board

My Pinterest “Book Lists” Board

100th.pngHello and happy Wednesday. Despite my obsessive behavior, I like to think I’m an organized person, and that’s why I absolutely adore Pinterest. For me, Pinterest is like this huge closet where I can just keep cute all the cute things I find, and I even get to select which drawer they go in.

I use it for my teaching stuff (I even have boards for subjects and grades I’m not currently teaching justincase) I have a board with pins of cute Hello Kitty stuff I see, and (please, potential romantic interest don’t see this) I even have a board called “Wedding Stuff” because I don’t want to be caught off guard when the moment comes.

Pinterest also fuels my love for books, which is what you came to read about, isn’t it? I have two bookish boards: one called Mila Loves Books, which is basically a collection of bookish quotes, memes, and relatable stuff; and another one called Book Lists. I created this second board to have a space where I could store all those challenges, rankings, and lists to feed my own TBR and wish list. I don’t really have a filter for the pins I save in this board: as long as they contain a book list, I’ll add it. This doesn’t mean I’m automatically adding the books to my wish list, but I might sometime in the future.

If you’re a parent or a caregiver and you want book recs for your child, I’m sure that in this board you’ll find pins that will help you. If you’re a teacher and you’re tired of reading Charlotte’s Web with your students, look for alternatives in one of these lists. If, like me, you just want to read the world a book at a time, pick a list, challenge yourself.

I have decided that my free time is worth nothing and that I will go through all of the lists in my board and I will add them all to the ultimate reading challenge. Now, as soon as I have that, I will make a post and share the details with you so that you can join me in the challenge.

Do you know of any reading challenge you’d like me to check out? Let me know in the comments!

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

DIY Bingo Poster

DIY Bingo Poster

Hello and happy Saturday. As a teacher, I’m often asked to do crafty stuff even if it’s not for the classroom. A few weeks ago, for a party at the institute where I take Portuguese classes, I was sent this picture to make a Bingo poster. I wasn’t sent a source so I have no idea who came up with the original poster, but in all honesty, I think it looks plain tacky.

I know non-teachers can see this and think “wow, there’s a lot going on,” but if you’re a teacher, then you know that the key to make an elaborate poster is to go step-by-step. I decided to keep the original idea of the poster, but to make it classier, you know? The elements would still be there (except for the giant head on top), but they would look better. In today’s post I’ll show you how I made my own Bingo poster, and of course, I’ll share with you the end result. Let’s get started, shall we?

The first thing I did were the letters, which I got from Life Over C’s. I colored them using jumbo markers. Now, when I say I did everything step-by-step, I mean I actually worked on each element and once I had everything ready, I glued it to a cardboard. That way, I avoided stuff falling out or getting wrinkled before the big Bingo day.

 

I went for a whimsical, multi-colored themed for this poster because I think part of the problem with the original one was that the colors were too opaque.

I printed these two cards from myfreebingocards.com and colored them using India ink markers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the remaining paper I made the chips, using the same colors I did for the cards.

 

 

 

This here is the end result. I think the light blue background makes the other colors pop. I added some banner-like thingies in the corner to make it look more like a fair stall, and kept the multi-colored vibe.

I think it keeps the elements of the original poster, but it’s a lot friendlier because the colors are way more vibrant, and it looks like something I’d make for one of my classes, so I’m pleased with the end result.

Is there any poster you’d like to re-create or simply make from scratch? Let me know and I might help you with it!

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

My Teacher Planner

My Teacher Planner

Hello and happy Saturday. Planning is a very important part of my job as a teacher, one that is sometimes boring, which is why I try to get work done ahead of time so I don’t have to worry about it later.  Last year I had a huge notebook as my teacher planner, but I found it to be impractical, so this year I decided to go use a binder. In today’s post I’ll share with you what’s inside of my planner. Let’s get started, shall we?

The first page you see there is actually my yearly planning for Pre-K. I have one for each grade I teach. What I did was take all the information I’d gathered throughout the previous year of school and then I arranged it in a chart. Basically what I have now is a list of every topic I worked on with each of my classes and the different activities we did. This will help me have a clear idea of how to plan my classes this year, given that in my school we make lesson plans every two weeks. I have this printed version I can highlight and add post it notes and scratch or whatever I need to do, and a digital version, which I’ll edit based on the changes I make throughout the year.

Now, I have to upload my lesson plans once every two weeks. The lesson plans are really simple and it takes no time to do them. They’re digital, however, and the format is not very friendly for a teacher who’s on the run most of the day, so what I’m using this year are the weekly planning templates from Playdough to Plato. The whole pack of planners, checklists, templates, and other planner essentials is completely free, and so are the other forms I’ll show you in this post.

I love this weekly planner because it’s super spacious and in the following page you have a section where you can take notes or add reminders so that you take them into account the following week.

I have not one but two grade books, one from Teacher Created Resources, and the other one, a total cutie my best friend gave me. The thing is, having a notebook or a binder and a grade book is the opposite of practical, really, so I decided to take them back home this year and use them some other time, maybe when I get my own classroom and don’t have to be running around everywhere.

This checklist template is from A Modern Teacher, and I love it because I get enough space to write the activity type I’m grading without everything looking crammed. The date section is also helpful because that way I can keep track of students who were absent that day or didn’t hand in a homework on time.

Speaking of missing homework, I’m going to start using the I Didn’t Do My Homework log I found on Pinterest. I’m going to use it with my older kids because I feel that way they can become more responsible for their own work. Last year I had a bit of trouble with grades because some students didn’t hand in their work, so now whenever I have a blank space in my checklist, I’ll approach the student, and if they don’t have the homework, I’ll write their name in the log. This way I can know who owes me stuff.

Once the classes start, I’m sure I’ll be adding more pages to this planner and I’ll keep you updated. I will, for example, add a monthly planner at the beginning so that I have important school-related dates in mind.

What are you using for a planner this year? Let me know!

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

 

 

Transportation Means for Kindergarten

Transportation Means for Kindergarten

Hello and happy Saturday. Here’s another week-in-review kinda post. Today, I’m going to share with you how we worked with transportation in Kindergarten.

Now, Pinterest is my happy place, so the ideas you’re going to see today were all inspired by pins I found while planning.

Monday started with me teaching my students The Transportation Song, from Mrs. Kelly’s Klass. I used a karaoke version of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star as background music.

This song gave me a lot to work with because obviously it includes many vocabulary words related to transportation. It also has the concepts near and far, which we explored with the help of some flash cards from Flash Card Fox I’d brought. Basically, I explained my boys that near means within city limits, while far means out of the city, the country, or even the planet in the case of a rocket.

I showed the boys each of the cards and they had to tell me whether each vehicle traveled near or far.

These cards also worked for the exercise I did next, which I did based on the Transportation Song as well.

You see, it is quite repetitive in the take a… part, so I tool the take a rocket to the moon bit and worked around it.

I wrote the formula I take a _________ to go to __________ and gave each boy a flash card. They have to complete the sentence using the means of transportation they got and a place. This also helped as a review exercise of the different city and neighborhood buildings.

At the end of the class we did a following instructions activity to review colors and basic vocabulary related to transportation.

I was inspired by this picture  to decorate the English whiteboard. Each boy colored a flash card from The Measured Mom, and then I cut them and made them look nice and pretty. The reason why I included “railway” as a subdivision of the land section is that, after the whole-class explanation, each boy individually developed a sorting worksheet by Preschool Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, we worked on Math centers using the transportation pattern block mats by Prekinders.com you can get the plastic shapes by clicking here.

What are some other cool things you do when teaching this topic? Let me know!

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

PS: Have you joined my bookish giveaway? Click here to check it out!

Math Centers for Teachers on a Budget: Task Cards

Math Centers for Teachers on a Budget: Task Cards

Hello and happy Saturday. Today I’ll continue talking about how I created my magic box for math centers without spending any money. Let’s begin by incorporating something I talked about on my previous post, that is, snap cubes. I got the gorgeous task cards from One Beautiful Home, printed them black-and-white, and then colored them with markers. I glued them to colored paper so that they were sturdier and that was it. I didn’t laminate them because I didn’t feel like it. I’m rarely in the mood for laminating, but that forces my students to be extra careful with the materials I give them.

For building shapes, I have two sets of task cards. There are ones in which students have to make shapes using popsicle sticks and they have the model drawn for them. I got those from The STEM Laboratory, which is a great source of activities and printables. I did laminate these cards. See? It’s a matter of mood.

We then have these, more complex cards, which challenge students to build shapes out of other shapes. I got them from Susan Jones Teaching. Now, here I cheated a tiny bit because what I plan on using with these cards is  a set of plastic shapes that I found in storage.I didn’t buy them, so technically I’m still following the “no spending money” rule. As an alternative, though, id you don’t want to spend money on plastic shapes, you can make paper ones. I glued these to origami paper.

Let me know what you use in your classes and whether you have any strategies to save money while having great resources.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

Math Centers for Teachers on a Budget

Math Centers for Teachers on a Budget

Hello and happy Saturday. A long while ago I posted a picture on Instagram showing one of the various methods I use to arrange materials when working on math centers. I then had the idea of writing and sharing with you what I’ve done with my centers without having to spend any money. Today I finally took the pictures of my materials and am ready to post. I’ll dedicate another entry to task cards because I don’t want to make this super long and boring.

Let me start by clarifying this: in Colombia, centers or small-group activities or whatever are not common. Most classrooms are not equipped for this kinds of class dynamics, and teachers aren’t always in charge of the majority of the subjects, as it happens in the U.S. What it means is that teachers like myself have to carry the materials and resources we use to the classrooms, so we have to look for ways to make this practical.

I’m a very eco-friendly teacher, and I’m also obsessed with online shopping, so I always have a box or two, which I use for storing my teaching stuff at home (remind me of posting about my supplies closet one day) or at school. I like that the boxes are open at the top because that makes it easy for me to grab what I need. They are also a great size because all of my math centers stuff fits but it’s not big or uncomfortable to carry.

Now let’s look at the inside of the box. I know I said I got everything for free, but I sort of cheated with the snap cubes because they were already in the storage closet when I started working at school. In the post on task cards I’ll talk in depth about what I do with these cubes. You can click here  to buy them at Amazon.

There’s also this cup filled with paper shapes. I colored and laminated some triangles I used for a STEAM activity in the past, the other paper shapes are blank and haven’t been laminated. I’m keeping those for a day when I don’t like what I planned, to have students color them and them make a drawing out of them. We also used these shapes in the past to make a shapes pizza. Let’s go back to the cup, though. On my birthday my best friend gave it to me. It was filled with candy, which I ate immediately. I kept this cup because it had a lid, which meant I knew I could use it to store something. And  I did!

Finally we have this cute counting activity I did when I was introducing numbers from 1 to 10. This is a freebie I got from Totschooling.net , which I adore because we got to do a lesson around If You Give a Mouse a Cookie. I laminated the jars and the cookies to make the materials reusable. The idea is for students to cover the cookies with golden stickers (“chips”) according to the number of dots, and then to match the cookie to the number in the jar. I made two sets so that each student can get at least one cookie.

There you go, these are some of my resources for math centers, which I got for free. As you can see, I’m more of a hands-on teacher, and I like to make things rather than buy them. I think by doing so, I’m doing the earth and my pocket a favor.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila