NetGalley Reads: All the Wrong Chords

NetGalley Reads: All the Wrong Chords

Hello and happy Friday. How are you? Are you taking care of yourselves? My routine hasn’t changed much, really. I mean, I am used to staying at home for whole days reading, so it’s not like I miss going outside. I miss seeing my students in person, but we can do videocalls. To keep myself entertained since the way I do my job has changed, I read, and I wanted to tell you about a nice, wholesome book I finished recently. I’m talking about All the Wrong Chords by Christine Hurley Deriso. I got this book via NetGalley for reviewing purposes, so I’d like to thank them, the author and the publisher for the opportunity. 

I read this book between March 22nd and March 25th, 2020 and gave it four stars. I know I already used this adjective to describe this book, but I think it sums it up perfectly: wholesome. Scarlett, the main character, is spending the summer at her grandfather’s house before leaving to university. Her relationship with her grandfather is beautiful and stays that way throughout the book. 

The story has some hard-hitting elements that we read about early on. Scarlett’s older brother has recently passed away due to drug overdose, and our main character is dealing with the guilt of thinking she could have done something to help him or prevent his death. Liam and Scarlett were very close, and he’s the one who taught her how to play guitar, which, judging by the title of the book, we know is going to be a recurring theme. 

There is romance and it is super cute but realistic in my opinion. I don’t want to give away too much about it because anything I say could be a spoiler. The only thing I’ll say is that there is a meet-cute to end all meet-cutes. Also, there’s again the love for grandparents and family in general. I don’t know about you, but if a potential romantic interest does not openly show love for his grandparents, he’s not worth it. 

I smiled a lot reading this book but I also cried a couple of times. I think it was perfect to keep me entertained and I would love it if it became a series and focused on the other members of the band. 

 What are you currently reading? Let me know in the comments below. 

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila 

NetGalley Reads: Clara Humble: Quiz Whiz

NetGalley Reads: Clara Humble: Quiz Whiz

NETFLIX TALK_.pngHello and happy Friday. It is no secret that I’ve been trying to consciously read more middle-grade books and I usually enjoy them quite a lot. What I’ve come to realize is that making the voice of a kid believable is not that easy, and that can either make or break a book. Today I’ll be reviewing Clara Humble: Quiz Whiz by Anna Humphrey, which I got via NetGalley, so I would like to thank them, the author and the publisher.

I read this book between March 9th and March 14th, 2020 and gave it two stars. Sadly, it didn’t do it for me. I had high hopes for it since it features a female main character who writes her own comic book, so I thought it would be empowering, challenging the so-called gender roles. Besides that, Clara is going to compete in a game show, and though I don’t read a lot about games or competitions in books, that can certainly make a plot exciting. It had all the elements to make it a solid read for me, but it didn’t deliver.

One of the first signs to me that probably I wasn’t going to enjoy this book was the fact that the main character, who is also the narrator, uses words that are “too big” for a kid. She uses words and phrases her ideas in ways that an adult could, and that’s a pet peeve of mine: when you can tell that the author is an older person trying to sound younger.

The other big issue I had was related to Clara’s character, again, especially when we consider that this book will be mainly read by children. She came across as petty to me, and I didn’t find her likable or appealing for young readers. Clara criticizes everybody who surrounds her or she thinks mean things about them, even her friends. For example, she compares one of her friends to a mouse because she’s small and quiet. That didn’t sit well with me, especially since Clara thinks that she’s perfect and she doesn’t grow as a character or realize that the way she thinks is wrong.

Clara has a best friend called Bradley and she constantly says that he’s quiet and shy. The first time this was said and the first time the gameshow was mentioned, I thought we would have them both fight because they were both competing. It went sort of like that since at first Bradley’s mom’s boyfriend is the person who makes him compete, but then once they’re both in the gameshow, the contestants (Clara included) start pulling pranks on each other and basically cheating to make the other one lose. This, again, is never addressed and there are no repercussions against anyone.

Do you know of any middle-grade novels that feature a female main character and/or a gameshow or contest of any sort? Let me know in the comments.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

 

 

NetGalley Reads: The Mountains Sing (DNF)

NetGalley Reads: The Mountains Sing (DNF)

NETFLIX TALK_.pngHello and happy Friday. I know I’ve never done this, but today I’ll be talking about a book I DNF’ed, or did not finish. This book was sent to me via NetGalley because I was invited to a blog tour by Algonquin, the publishing house. Like I’ve mentioned earlier, I’ve been invited to several bog tours lately, and that’s actually the only way in which I am getting books from NetGalley now, as I am not requesting anything. Now that we got that out of the way, let’s review this.

I started reading The Mountains Sing by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai on February 1st, 2020 and did not finish it, which is why I am not going to rate it. I was excited to read and review this book because the author is Vietnamese and it made me happy that NetGalley, and especially Algonquin, was helping promote diversity in the bookish industry.

The book starts with the main character telling us about their recently deceased grandmother and the stories she would tell. That alone sounds fascinating, right? Well, every time I sat down and read, I would feel like I was not retaining anything. There are some books that require the readers to reach a certain point to get truly hooked, and I felt that I never got to that point. I mostly read at night, after long days of teaching, and for some reason, I could not focus on this story.

There are alternating perspectives and timelines, which is something I usually love, but the way it was done in this book, it went over my head. I got very confused because I wasn’t sure about who was talking or what they were talking about, and I know that I had no clue about Vietnam, but it was deeper than that, it was about the author’s narrative style that was too advanced for me.

Had I read this on vacation or during a time when I could be 100% dedicated to the story, I think I would have been able to finish it and truly value it for what it was, but this experience with it was leading me towards a three or even a two-star rating. I recognize the importance of this book, but it wasn’t for me.

I am not going to attempt to read it later, but if you are able to finish it, let me know what you thought about it.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

NetGalley Reads: Radical Self-Love

NetGalley Reads: Radical Self-Love

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Hello and happy Friday. I’m not one for reading a lot of nonfiction but I have been acquiring some books and the time has come for me to read them. Because I’m not an avid nonfiction reader, I don’t really have a stance on those books. I’ve read a couple memoirs I’ve loved, but I also want to read more self-improvement books and see if, you know, I can improve. This is why I recently read Radical Self-Love by Gala Darling, and trust me when I say I was super excited to get to it because the title sounded just like the thing I needed. I got this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review, so I’d like to thank them, the author and the publisher.

I read this book between February 10th and February 16th, 2020 and gave it two stars. I was very excited at first because I felt like it would be a treat to myself, learning how to love myself and all that. I thought it would live up to its title, but it was more superficial than anything else. There was nothing truly radical about the advice given.

Within the self-improvement books, this would be the kind in which the author addresses the reader, so it’s like having a conversation with a friend. This book has illustrations, so I thought that would make it a quick read. It wasn’t really, but considering the fact that I only read it after work, it didn’t take me that long to finish either. Although it doesn’t explicitly say that this book is targeted for women only, it is, and I found that unnecessary. This could have been easily a book for everyone, had the author actually succeeded at making it gender-neutral, but more on that later.

At first, I think I was being way too nice because I wrote that although it was full of clichés and commonplaces, it was a well-intended and light read. Now as I have time to digest this book I keep feeling that I was lied to; I was promised a book about RADICAL self-love, and I got a list of fashion advice. There is also conversation about eating disorders and how to “get rid” of them, which I found problematic. I understand that the author was talking about her own experience and how she dealt with her eating disorders, but this is not a memoir, it is an advice book. There wasn’t a real talk about mental health or going to therapy, which I think would be crucial if as a reader you are at a point in which you’re seeking advice from a book titled Radical Self-Love.

The author has a blog and she constantly includes plugs for readers to visit and download resources, which I thought made the book even less serious. Like I said, the advice provided was very superficial and not a lot of research (besides quotes from other self-improvement books) seems to have been made. Another issue that bothered me was the fact that the author tried to be inclusive in her language when she discussed relationships, but she failed to do so and let her heteronormativity show. It would have been much better had she stuck to gender-neutral language.

Have you read a self-improvement book that changed your life? I’m still in search of mine, so do leave me your recommendations in the comments.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

NetGalley Review: And We Call It Love

NetGalley Review: And We Call It Love

Hello and happy Friday. I think last year I became stricter with my ratings and 2020 won’t be an exception. Today’s book is perhaps my second or third two-starred book of the year, and I’m sure it won’t be the last. I’m talking about And We Call it Love by Amanda Vink, a book that was sent to me for reading and reviewing purposes, so I’d like to thank NetGalley, the publisher, and the author.

I read this book between January 27th and 28th, 2020 and like I said I gave it two stars. The entire story is written in verse and that’s not my thing. I was only happy about the fact that I’d fly through it, and I did considering that I only had a few minutes every night. Judging by the title and the cover I knew it wasn’t going to be a lovey-dovey story, but it went in a completely different direction than what I’d anticipated.

I first thought it would feature a romance between the two main characters, who were both females, and I was excited about the LGBTQ* themes, but that wasn’t the case. I don’t even know what made me think that one of the main characters was in love with the other, but that’s what I thought. Besides that, I was very confused at the beginning because the narration, which is all in verse, alternates between the two main characters, Clare and Zari, but there’s nothing that explicitly tells you whose perspective you’re reading from.

Part of why I say that verse is not my thing is the fact that I feel like I’m always getting the general picture of the story, not the whole thing. I get the main idea but no details, if you will, and I am a sucker for details. Had the story been written in prose, I would’ve gotten the alternating perspectives way quicker, without needing any titles or any explicit indication of who was talking. All in all, I felt like I was reading the SparkNotes version of an actual story.

For such a short book, I thought there wasn’t a clear focus of the plot. We already know that there isn’t a romance between the two best friends, but the story doesn’t focus on their friendship either. It’s more of a coming of age story, in my opinion. Both Clare and Zari start dating different boys, and on top of that, Zari’s family doesn’t want her hanging out with Clare, so they drift apart. The synopsis makes it seem like it was Zari’s boyfriend who didn’t let her be with her friend, but the mom was also a huge influence on that friendship drifting apart. Zari’s boyfriend, Dion, is a dickhead, though, and he physically and psychologically abuses her, so trigger warning for that. Because this was such a short book, the ending wrapped up pretty quickly and in my opinion, it was way too happy considering the topics the story was dealing with.

Do you like stories written in verse? Let me know in the comments below.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

 

NetGalley Reads: Postcards for a Songbird

NetGalley Reads: Postcards for a Songbird

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Hello and happy Friday. This will be my last NetGalley review of January because I have to start focusing on February and trying to plan how everything’s going to go considering my vacation is over. Today I want to talk to you about a book I fell in love with almost immediately and an author that I certainly want to read more of in the future. I’m talking about Postcards for a Songbird by Rebekah Crane. This book was sent to me via NetGalley for reading and reviewing purposes, so as always, I’d like to thank them, the publisher and the author for the opportunity.

I read this book between December 23rd and December 25th, 2019 and gave it four stars. I’ll spoil this review a bit and say I’d totally planned on giving it five stars, but there was one detail towards the end that made me change my rating. It was silly, but not silly enough for me to let go of.

This is the story of Wren, whose mom left when she was a baby and whose sister and best friend Lizzie, just recently left as well. At the beginning of the book, we see that Wren is clearly overcome by absence, and her dad is so worried about her that he thinks it would be best for her to go live with her aunt in another city. The whole deal about the sibling who left gave me Where Things Come Back vibes at first, but as I keep thinking about it, it’s more like Paper Hearts by Ali Novak, since Lizzie left the house voluntarily and, as we discover, starts sending Wren postcards, hence the title of the story.

Wren’s dad is a police officer who works nights, so we don’t see those characters interacting much. We can see the effort he makes to have her kid live a “normal” life despite everything that’s happened to them. I really liked him as a character and I thought that we could witness a bit of development in his relationship with Wren. The plot twist I didn’t appreciate has to do with him and I honestly think his whole character was ruined by it.

The story takes place during the summer, and what we read about is Wren inadvertently taking her life back and in a way moving on from the burden of her mom and her sister. She starts realizing that there is a world outside of the bubble she and Lizzie used to live in, and that leads her to meet an amazing group of people. Besides that, she starts texting her next-door neighbor, a boy who cannot leave the house because he’s super sick and afraid of everything. Don’t worry, they don’t fall in love, although there is some romance.

One of the characters is physically abused by her father, so trigger warning for that. Overall, this is an emotionally charged story, and though we see growth and there are happy moments, it might not be the best choice for someone suffering from depression. To me, this book did what Jandy Nelson failed to do with I’ll Give You the Sun, which I didn’t really like.

Do you like books about siblings? Let me know in the comments.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

NetGalley Reads: Tweet Cute

NetGalley Reads: Tweet Cute

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Hello and happy Wednesday. I can tell someone out there is taking me more seriously as a book reviewer because I actually got asked to review today’s book. Not just that, but it’s part of a blog tour or something like that.  As always, I’d like to thank NetGalley, the publisher, and the author for this opportunity. By the way, if you’re a regular here, this book does not fit the theme of titles I’m reading for January; I simply decided the post the review today because the book was released yesterday.

I read Tweet Cute by Emma Lord between November 11th and November 17th, 2019 and gave it three stars. Let me tell you, I was honestly kind of scared to read this because it was so hyped I really wanted to genuinely like it. Based on my rating alone you can draw your own conclusions, but I’d like you to keep reading so that I can explain where the rating came from.

Most of the young adult books I currently read are backlisted titles, so when I read them I consider the fact that they were published years ago. Tweet Cute, though, is a 2020 release, so it is a current take into young adult romance. My expectations, of course, were high, since I think readers have become more critical throughout the years and expect their books to portray healthy romances, realistic characters, and to subvert tropes that are straight-up wrong. What I found, however, was a cookie-cutter story, at least at the beginning.

I’m going to say this now so that it doesn’t lead to confusion or eye rolls on your part: I know this is a re-telling of You’ve Got Mail, but I haven’t watched the movie (gasp) and I believe that, as an original piece of literature, it should stand on its own, so the comparison to the movie is unnecessary to me. Now that we’ve got that out of the way, I’ll proceed to explain why I thought it was cookie-cutter.

You know a story is going to be predictable when the love interest is introduced in the first few pages of the story. In the case of this novel, our quirky main character with a silly nickname mentions her nemesis on page two, which led me to believe that this would be an enemies-to-lovers kind of story. Now, I must be fair to the novel and say it sort of was but it sort of wasn’t. Yes, there was rivalry, but the characters weren’t really enemies, more like the guy used to tease the girl and she got annoyed, but then they become friends.

This review is probably all over the place but so was the novel, so I feel like I must go back and forth when sharing my thoughts. The story is told from the perspective of Pepper, the female main character, and Jack, the male main character. Like I said, Jack sort of teases Pepper at school and she can’t stand him, but that’s at the very beginning of the book. On top of that, both Jack and Pepper’s families have food businesses: Jack’s family owns a deli that’s pretty much a staple in their neighborhood, and Pepper’s family owns a fast-food chain. Pepper is often in charge of the restaurant’s Twitter account, and she’s also into blogging. Judging by this information, and the title alone, we know that there’s going to be an online romance.

Although in theory, I like elements that are present in this novel, like the dual perspectives or the potential online romance, I felt that the chapters were too long, the perspectives weren’t really alternated in a way that made sense, and the romance was just one more plot device from a list of random events and situations presented by the author. It was just too much for a book that was supposed to be cute and lighthearted.

There was also a potential love triangle, which again, was introduced very early on. In a way, I feel like the author just handed the reader a bunch of drama that was going to be developed and resolved throughout the story, instead of introducing it as the plot progressed. We got all these things: Pepper’s grades, a Twitter feud between Pepper and Jack’s families, something about the swim team, Pepper and Jack’s online relationship and the fact that they didn’t know they were corresponding with each other…it wasn’t overwhelming but it was all over the place.

One thing that I noticed and despised was the fact that whenever a same-sex couple was mentioned, the only thing they were doing was making out. Even the people talking about them said that the only thing they did was making out. Ethan, Jack’s brother, had a boyfriend, and all the conversations regarding Ethan went like this: “Where’s Ethan?” “I don’t know, probably sucking face with his boyfriend.” It was okay the first time, but I noticed a pattern and I think it completely defeated the purpose of making this a diverse book.

I liked Jack way more than I liked Pepper, and I’ll acknowledge that as a me-problem. However, I think both characters were unrealistically portrayed when it came to their pop culture references. I found it odd, for example, that Jack talked about High School Musical, not because he’s a guy, but because that’s a movie that was relevant to people from my generation, people who are at least eight years older than Jack and Pepper.

When you get past all the initial drama that is thrown at you,  the story actually becomes enjoyable. I totally rooted for both characters and I think their relationship involved from kind of enemies to friends to a couple. I must say, though, that it takes so long for them to be “something else” that at times I thought I would’ve been just as happy if they ended up as friends or maybe the story ended with the possibility of more.

Overall, I’d make this story 100 pages shorter. I think there was too much drama added towards the end when everything seems to be resolved. This story made the same mistake as Simon Vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli, in which the characters are completely unaware that they are talking to each other online. I found this even harder to believe in Tweet Cute since they’re actually getting closer in real life. I feel like that’s an indication that they don’t really know each other if they can’t even deduce from the texts they’ve been exchanging that they are talking to the other person. I don’t know. I just feel that I’d know who my man is even if he had a lame username. 

The whole miscommunication drama towards the end was absolutely unnecessary. I was finally enjoying my reading experience and all the conflicts were being resolved nicely, and then that happened. I could’ve totally done without it.

Do you have any cute online romance recommendations for me? Tell me about them in the comments below.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

NetGalley Reads: The Long-Lost Secret Diary of the World’s Worst Dinosaur Hunter

NetGalley Reads: The Long-Lost Secret Diary of the World’s Worst Dinosaur Hunter

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Hello and happy Friday. What a mouthful of a title, right? It seems like I’m suddenly obsessed with dinosaurs, but really it’s all part of this month’s theme, have you guessed it? Today I want to share a review of a middle-grade book I found super interesting and easy to read, so much so that I read it all in one day -in one sitting, actually. I’m talking about The Long-Lost Secret Diary of the World’s Worst Dinosaur Hunter by Tim Collins. This book was sent to me via NetGalley for reading and reviewing purposes, so I’d like to thank them, the author and the publisher for the opportunity.

I read this book on December 22nd and gave it for stars. One thing I love about this book is that it is illustrated. To me, illustrations add a lot to the reading experience. As a teacher, for example, I could have my kids read this book and I could use the illustrations to deepen the conversation, to ensure understanding if something in the text was not clear, or simply to provide a visual reference to the story.

The book is written in diary format written by Ann, our main character. Ann is based on Mary Anning, a real “dinosaur hunter.” I love that we have a female main character who is based on an actual historical figure because that challenges many stereotypes that live to this day about boys or men being the only ones interested in or capable of working as paleontologists.

The story starts with Ann digging what she calls “lizard fish” bones where she lives. Her dad sells these bones for almost nothing until someone comes and becomes interested in Ann’s findings. This leads to Ann traveling to London with her dad to talk about the bones she’d been digging to a group of paleontologists and then travel to the New World to continue her expedition and research.

Occasionally, we get these sections titled “Get Real,” which provide factual information to support the fiction we just read about. For example, we get clarification about the type of dinosaur Ann found, or we also get historical facts about the different places she and her dad visit. Like I said, this book has great educational value and I really enjoyed reading it.

What topic would you have liked to learn more about as a kid? Let me know in the comments.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

NetGalley Reads: The Collected Works of Gretchen Oyster

NetGalley Reads: The Collected Works of Gretchen Oyster

NETFLIX TALK_.pngHello and happy Friday. I don’t know what happened to me a few weeks ago but I was reading a lot. Among those books I read was one which I found super interesting, quick, and easy to read. I’m talking about The Collected Works of Gretchen Oyster by Cary Fagan. This book was sent to me via NetGalley for reading and reviewing purposes, so I’d like to thank the author, NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity.

I read this book on December 23rd, 2019 and gave it four stars. If there were a half-star rating system, I would’ve probably given it four and a half stars. The main character, whose name I can’t remember, lives in a middle-of-nowhere-town and isn’t having a great time in life considering his older brother ran away from home. His family is trying to settle as best as they can with this, so their life is pretty uneventful until our main character goes to the public library and finds this artsy card with a quirky message and a number one.

The main character sets out to collect the other ones, and we all know I love a quest plot. He doesn’t really have much of a quest, considering that Gretchen Oyster, the artist behind the cards, lives in the same town and goes to high school with the main character’s older siblings. We get some chapters from her perspective and it’s interesting to see the process behind the creation of the postcards and what they entail for Gretchen.

I think one of the reasons why I read this book so quickly was the narration style. Think John Green or Adam Silvera; the main character/narration is telling the events as if they were talking to a friend, and I love that because it makes me really connect to the story. The chapters are super short, so they left me wanting to keep going and before I knew it, I was done with the book. I also really liked that we got inserts of the postcards made by Gretchen and since I had a digital copy they were in full color. It added to the experience of reading this novel.

While there are positive aspects to the story being short, you also as a reader have to consider that it will be lacking some depth and development. There’s stuff that’s glossed over, there are situations that resolve too easily or too quickly or none at all.  The characters don’t really grow or change in any way, but then again, I don’t think that was the purpose of this novel. The main character is thirteen years old, so I would say this is a good transition between middle grade and young adult since the contents are hard-hitting and raw at times.

What was the last book you read in one day? Would you recommend it? Tell me about it in the comments below.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

NetGalley Reads: The Dog Walker’s Diary

NetGalley Reads: The Dog Walker’s Diary

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Hello and happy Friday. Usually, when I’m reading a book and I change my mind about it, it’s for the better, but sometimes I’m reading something awesome that all of a sudden turns out to be less than. This is what happened to me with The Dog Walker’s Diary by Kathryn Donahue, a book that was sent to me for reading and reviewing purposes. I’d like to thank NetGalley, the author and the publisher for this opportunity.

I read this book between October 9th and October 11th, 2019 and gave it three stars. There’s this distasteful “joke” at the beginning about the main character’s behavior being similar to the one of a person with Tourette’s, schizophrenia, and Asperger. Oh, and “anorexic” is never an appropriate adjective. Look, if as an author, you can’t find enough adjectives to describe someone’s behavior that you must make fun of mental illness and neurodiversity, maybe you shouldn’t write at all. If that alone is cause for you not to read this book, I get it. I, however, kept reading and found myself drawn to the story…until halfway through. I’ll further explain this later.

The main character of this book is a man in his forties who has two dogs and finds himself hiring this dog walker. Besides his narration, we get his and the dog walker’s/ love interest’s entries in a “dog diary,” which is their way to correspond. I thought this was super original and it was a nice way to see, and not be told, how the relationship between the characters evolved. The characters are called Daniel and Annie, by the way.

Daniel is strange, and he admits to this. He is very superstitious and awkward, and he admits to being incapable of falling in love. He is also afraid of redheads, which is very unfortunate considering Annie is a redhead. However bad he might seem, he is absolutely adorable with his dogs, which to me helped redeem him as a character. Annie is very smart and witty, and in her diary entries, he writes stories to Daniel about his dogs’ past lives, which I found amazing.

If you’re reading this expecting a traditional romance novel, look elsewhere. Although the relationship between Daniel and Annie develops throughout the first half of the book into a romance, this is not really the center of the plot. You see, Daniel is a literary agent, and he becomes interested in Annie’s stories but is also weary at the fact that maybe she contacted him with the sole purpose of getting them published. We also read about this subplot in which Daniel gets a client who wrote a masterpiece and he wants to publish it.

Because the story alternates between what Annie and Daniel writes and his narration, I got Big Fish/ My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry Vibes, where you have this fantastic story with other-worldly characters, but it has some truth to it. So far I’ve been talking wonders about the first half of the book, but what really troubled me was the second half.

There’s also a potential love triangle that has the characters fake-dating each other at some point, but I was down for that since I knew they were perfect for each other and would end up together.

A little over halfway through, the story starts focusing way more on Annie and Daniel’s romance, and for a person who’s read so much, I know that nothing good comes from two characters who get together when we still have 50% of the story to read. Also, I didn’t like that Annie’s stories stopped abruptly and we didn’t get them anymore. I know that by having the characters be a couple, the written correspondence didn’t need to happen, but it would’ve been nice to have a story thrown here and there.

So, the characters do get together and then it was like someone had changed the book I was reading because the plot didn’t make any sense. We start getting these silly plot twists and time jumps, and honestly, it was as if the author had gotten bored with the story and wanted to end it in any way possible. It would have been better to have the two halves of the book divided into their own separate books, in which case I wouldn’t have read book two.

Have you been negatively surprised by a book you loved at first? Let me know in the comments below.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila