Your Yearly Dose of Levithan

Your Yearly Dose of Levithan

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Hello and happy Wednesday. If you’ve been here around, then you know that I absolutely adore David Levithan and that throughout the years I’ve read my fair share of his works. I especially admire his originality and his way of making every story unique. The Realm of Possibility, which is the latest book I’ve read by him, doesn’t disappoint.

The stakes were clearly high because as I mentioned, I love this author and I have been reading his books for almost five years now. I have literally grown up with them, although I haven’t really matured much in these years. This book is super short, only a little over two hundred pages and it is written in verse, so I think it would be perfect for someone who is still in the process of getting into reading, or for someone who wants a quick read. This will definitely help to get you out of a reading slump.

David Levithan’s stories usually have a heavy LGBTQ* component, I think that’s his staple, and he does it really well. Along with Nina LaCour, I believe he is the best author I’ve read when it comes to LGBTQ* representation.

The Realm of Possibility is divided into sections, and each section has a set of poems from different characters, so each individual poem tells a story. All the characters attend the same high school, so we’re really being told parts of one big story. I think this is a super complex task that can easily go wrong, but the author did an amazing job of giving each character their own voice and style; each poem is unique.

There are descriptions of what seems to be an eating disorder. This is only present in two of the poems, so if you really want to read this book but are sensitive to this issue, maybe ask someone to read it before you do and tell you which poems are so that you can skip them. You won’t be missing out on key pieces of information.

What is a YA author that you have loved for years? Let me know in the comments below.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

 

ARC Review: The Invisibles

ARC Review: The Invisibles

Hello and happy Wednesday. Today I want to share my thoughts on The Invisibles by Francis Gideon. I got this book via NetGalley for reviewing purposes and I’m always excited to read new content and learn about authors that were unknown for me. Let’s get started, shall we?

My very first thought when I started reading this was, “man, this is a very short book,” then I did some research and found out that there’s this thing called flash fiction and it’s just very short stories where there is still character and plot development. I’m not sure whether this particular story belongs to the “flash fiction” category, but if you know anything about it, let me know in the comments below.

Precisely because of the brevity of the story, the style is super simple. I mean, this writing style is something I would recommend to someone who wants to get into reading but doesn’t enjoy longer, more complex books. Keep in mind that I got an ARC, so there were some grammar mistakes I hope were corrected when the final edition was published.

Now, of course, you know I’m going to talk about stuff I didn’t like about this book, and something that really annoyed me was the way one of the characters, who was black, was physically described. I mean, “a tall guy with dark features”? Really? Couldn’t the author just say “a tall black guy”?

From what I read in my little research, Francis Gideon mostly writes LGBTQ* fiction, and The Invisibles is no exception. It is obvious that Mike, the main character, has feelings for Johnny, his new friend, and as I kept reading I realized this was a “guy-discovers-he’s-gay” kind of story.

I don’t know how I felt about the fact that the author sort of “used” the events of 9/11 as an excuse to make the story more interesting. You see, in the first scene our characters are in the classroom when the principal tells them what just happened to the Twin Towers. The events of September 11th become a topic of conversation for our main character and his love interest, but to me, adding that as a “background” event was totally unnecessary and kind of insensitive.

It had been a while since I read and reviewed a NetGalley ARC, but I promise there are more where this came from. If you have any LGBTQ* suggestions, send them my way because I feel that I’ve been lacking some good queer reads in my life.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

I’ve Been a Bad Ally

I’ve Been a Bad Ally

Hello and happy Wednesday. I usually try to read my fair share of LGBTQ* books, but I don’t know why I haven’t in a while. The last LGBTQ* book I’ve read in I don’t know how long was The Summer I Wasn’t Me by Jessica Verdi, and it made up for the months in which I’ve been a bad ally.

I liked this book from the beginning because it starts setting the scene for the reader, describing the location and a little bit of the plot and the characters without telling right away what’s going on.

Now, when we are finally introduced to the core of the plot, the story gets a vibe similar to The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth, which is a total LGBTQ* must. If you’ve read both stories, you’ll know why I think they have a similar vibe. For me, it was one more reason to love this book.

I think I’ve read my fair share of LGBTQ* books, but this story was different from what I’ve already read. Lexi, the main character, is going to a camp to basically stop being gay, which is a common scenario for this kind of novels. The difference is that Lexi seems to actually want the camp to work. That fact itself makes this read stand out, and is very promising.

I also really like the fact that there is a back story, and that this is not just about Lexi and her experience in camp. There’s family drama, and Lexi appears to be the one taking care of her mother and not the other way around.

Of course, this is YA, so there has to be romance. There’s an insta crush, but in this story it’s super cute, so I totally let it slide.

The way this story is constructed is amazing because it’s full of tiny flashbacks that help us understand Lexi and her reasons for going to camp. I’m always down for flashbacks in a story and I think they make it way more interesting.

Because this story is set in a camp, it did remind me of But I’m a Cheerleader, but of course, unlike the movie, this is not a parody. This story is by no means a comedy, and there are bits that some people might find triggering. For me, it is a total LGBT* must and I’m happy to have read it.

As always, if you know of a similar book that I might like, please share it in the comments below and I’ll be sure to read and review it.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila