Don’t Read Thirteen Reasons Why, Read This Instead

Don’t Read Thirteen Reasons Why, Read This Instead

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Hello and happy Friday. One of the most problematic books out there, which has been adapted to a Netflix show is 13 Reasons Why by Jay Asher. It is, in my opinion, an invitation for vulnerable readers and viewers to consider suicide as an option and it just worries me what it can do to people, especially teenagers who come across this content.

I’m not saying that we should not read about suicide, I am saying that this theme was not handled with the care that something so problematic should. If someone has recommended this book to you, or you don’t know whether you should read it, I’m here to bring you not one but two alternatives that deal with the topic of suicide in a smarter way. Needless to say, if you feel that this is a very sensitive theme for you, do not read these books.

On one hand, we have My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga. I’ve deemed this book a “must read” because I think it sends a very strong message when it comes to truly seeing, appreciating and loving the world around us, even when struggling with mental illness. It has romance, but it is especially heavy on friendship and the importance of having a tight bond with someone, which is something that 13 Reasons Why lacked.

On the other hand, there’s Falling Into Place by Amy Zhang. There is a suicide attempt in this book, but we get to explore and try to understand, if this is even possible, what led to this person taking such an extreme decision. Again, there is a discussion related to what life is worth and what makes it so valuable. It is way more than just the story of someone who has decided to die, and that is what makes it so powerful.

Did you read/ watch 13 Reasons Why? What are your thoughts about it? Let me know in the comments below.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

Don’t Read Forever…, Read This Instead

Don’t Read Forever…, Read This Instead

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Hello and happy Wednesday. I hope you’re having a great day. There are some books that become cult favorites and some authors that everyone knows about. I’m not talking about classics or anything like that, but middle grade or young adult books and authors that are very well known.

One of these icons when it comes to children’s/middle grade/ young adult literature is Judy Blume. I’d never read anything by her growing up, but I was always fascinated by this book by her that was in my best friend’s bookshelves. I’m talking about Forever…this book about a girl’s “first time” that was super revolutionary when it was first published and even decades later. Seriously, I didn’t get what the fuss was all about. In my opinion, it was poorly written and there wasn’t really a storyline to follow other than a teenager’s mediocre sex adventures. I think the underlying message of “don’t have sex, our you’ll cheat on your boyfriend with some random dude” is straight up problematic.

Now, I get it, maybe the author wanted to make readers aware of the indirect consequences of having sex or whatever. That could have been handled better and indeed it was in Finding Cinderella by Colleen Hoover. This book is part of a series, but it is actually a spin-off novella, so you don’t need to have read the other books to understand or enjoy this one. Like Forever… it deals with sex and the consequences it might bring, but there is so much more to the story that I think you’ll end up loving it.

Honestly, virginity and the loss of it are not topics I’m drawn to in literature, and I’d prefer them to be handled in a more natural way. What is your take on this topic? Do you like it? Do you hate it? Are you indifferent? Let me know in the comments below.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

Don’t Read The Harder I Fall, Read This Instead

Don’t Read The Harder I Fall, Read This Instead

Boys' Night Out.pngHello and happy Wednesday. Welcome to another installment of “Don’t Read Sh*t, Read This Instead.” Today, I bring you two books that might appear similar even by the title, but one is clearly better than the other one.

You might have come across The Harder I Fall by Jessica Gibson through Goodreads recommendations or those BookBub emails that tell you which books are on sale or for free. I’m almost certain that I didn’t pay anything for this book, which makes me slightly less angry that I bought it but all the more concerned that it is available for vulnerable or unknowing readers.

Basically, this book is about this girl who starts college and there she meets this seemingly perfect guy whom she (obviously) falls in love with. But there’s a catch because our main character has a dark past and a very troubled family history, and what is the best way to deal with that? Marrying the guy you just met a few months ago, of course. As far as I remember, this book deals in a very irresponsible way with domestic abuse, alcoholism and eating disorders. It also portrays an unhealthy romantic relationship.

I get it, though, there are some tropes that we like. A few years ago, for example, I was super into the whole coming-of-age thing with the characters starting college because I no longer related to high-school based stories. And I also get that some readers want their characters to have a backstory and not a particularly happy one. If that is handled well, it can lead to a really interesting novel, like This Is Falling from Ginger Scott.  You get the main character with a troubled past, who’s just starting college, you get the amazing love interest, and what’s even better, you get an entire series. If you’ve been around for a while, then you probably already know that I love Ginger Scott and that I’ve read several of her books already, and I definitely recommend This Is Falling.

Do you like novels that are set in college? Is there any title you’d recommend? Let me know in the comments below.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

Don’t Read Becoming Us, Read This Instead

Don’t Read Becoming Us, Read This Instead

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Hello and happy Wednesday. I’m still not sure about the name of this series so your suggestions will be kindly appreciated. Basically, I’ll be looking at the books I’ve given one star on Goodreads, and I’ll recommend an alternative to them so that you read quality content and don’t waste your time on books that are just not worth it. I have already reviewed these books, so I will just focus on why I think you’d like one instead of the other and I’ll try to link the reviews so that you can read them. Let’s get started, shall we?

I don’t want you to read shit, and Becoming Us by Amy Daws is pure shit. I think it is one of the first books I gave a one-star rating to, but rest assure that I did it for good reason. The synopsis doesn’t really tell me a lot. We have a dumb college girl who’s been “friend-zoned” by a guy and who then meets this mysterious stranger, so we know that there’s going to be a love triangle.

Now, if this is a trope that you’re into, I think you’ll really enjoy Easy by Tammara Webber [x]. I think this has a very original take in the whole love triangle deal. It also has a mysterious stranger but unlike the one in Becoming Us, this one isn’t a possessive jerk. Both Easy and Becoming us take place in college, so if that’s the vibe you’re going for, I suggest you read Easy.

I think I got Becoming Us for free or for very cheap, and it was advertised on BookBub or something of the sort. Being a small book blogger means that I take any chance I get at free or cheap books, and that’s why I got this one. Don’t read it, though. I only give one-star ratings to books that either send hateful messages or that do not handle well certain issues that are either related to mental health, abuse, or other problematic situations. Becoming Us romanticizes abusive relationships, so it’s a book I do not recommend under any circumstances. Read Easy instead, I guarantee you’ll like it.

Do you have any college-based stories that feature a love triangle? Let me know in the comments below.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila