Splendies #3 Haul

Splendies #3 Haul

Hello and happy Sunday. Welcome to another post in which I show you my undies. If this is your first time here, hi, my name is Camila and I got myself a one-year subscription of Splendies, so every month I get three panties delivered to my home. Let’s get started, shall we?

First, we have the granny panties, which honestly I think I only wore once and then never saw again. That’s the nice thing about living with other women, right? I personally wasn’t a huge fan of these panties because their cut was too low, so it hit me below my belly and I prefer those that cover it. That’s why I wasn’t really mad about losing them.

The thong has become essential when I wear leggings or tight pants because the material is so thin and so fitted that it doesn’t show. I love thongs and would wear them every single day, but this is especially comfortable.

The pink ones are nice for when I’m not trying too hard. Yes, they also hit below the waist, but they’re more comfortable than the granny panties and they’re cute and playful.

Which of the styles featured is your favorite and why? Let me know in the comments below.

Happy Sunday!

Love, Miss Camila

 

Teaching in Colombia vs. the U.S

Teaching in Colombia vs. the U.S

My Teaching Resolution.pngHello and happy Saturday. The other day, I was watching Early Edventures on YouTube and I got an idea for a post. You see, teaching in Colombia can be very different from teaching in the States, at least from the experience that I’ve had. I’ve made a list of six differences I’ve found, which I’ll share with you today. Let’s get started, shall we?

1. Transportation 

I have worked in three schools, and in all of them, teachers had the chance to ride the school buses to and from school. I don’t drive, so without the possibility of using the school bus, I would have had to rely on public transportation.

2. Arrival time 

From the YouTube videos I watched, teachers in the U.S get to school earlier and leave later than students. In the schools I’ve worked at, teachers got to school at the same time as the students and left at the same time, except for one day a week, when we had meetings. I very rarely got to school or stayed after “contract hours,” if I’m being honest.

3. Dress code

Now, I don’t know if this has been an unlucky coincidence for me or what, but I feel like, at least in the schools I’ve worked at, dress codes are stricter than in the States. In two of the schools I had to wear black bottoms and a lab coat, and in the other one, I could wear navy bottoms and white or ivory tops. I wish I could rock all the colorful stuff teachers in the U.S do.

4. Planning 

I’m sure that teachers in the States plan in advance, but they just don’t show it in their YouTube videos. However, I feel like there is more flexibility for them to just come up with an idea one day and execute it the next one. Again, I envy that freedom.

5. State/ Standardized Testing

This is something I don’t envy because thankfully for me, I’ve only once had my students undergo testing of this kind, and I wasn’t responsible for grading the tests. People from an agency went to the school and administered the test. There was even somebody in the room with me monitoring the kids. With the younger kids, I could design the tests, and I graded them according to the standards I had set.

6. Lunch and snacks 

I would have been very sad if I’d have had to bring my own food to school. Things don’t work that way here. Teachers are usually given snacks and lunch, at least in the places I’ve worked at. Now, in two of the schools, this was discounted from our salary, but it was a very low price, and the food was great.

What differences have you noticed regarding your work among various places? Let me know in the comments below.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

NetGalley Reads: Clara Humble: Quiz Whiz

NetGalley Reads: Clara Humble: Quiz Whiz

NETFLIX TALK_.pngHello and happy Friday. It is no secret that I’ve been trying to consciously read more middle-grade books and I usually enjoy them quite a lot. What I’ve come to realize is that making the voice of a kid believable is not that easy, and that can either make or break a book. Today I’ll be reviewing Clara Humble: Quiz Whiz by Anna Humphrey, which I got via NetGalley, so I would like to thank them, the author and the publisher.

I read this book between March 9th and March 14th, 2020 and gave it two stars. Sadly, it didn’t do it for me. I had high hopes for it since it features a female main character who writes her own comic book, so I thought it would be empowering, challenging the so-called gender roles. Besides that, Clara is going to compete in a game show, and though I don’t read a lot about games or competitions in books, that can certainly make a plot exciting. It had all the elements to make it a solid read for me, but it didn’t deliver.

One of the first signs to me that probably I wasn’t going to enjoy this book was the fact that the main character, who is also the narrator, uses words that are “too big” for a kid. She uses words and phrases her ideas in ways that an adult could, and that’s a pet peeve of mine: when you can tell that the author is an older person trying to sound younger.

The other big issue I had was related to Clara’s character, again, especially when we consider that this book will be mainly read by children. She came across as petty to me, and I didn’t find her likable or appealing for young readers. Clara criticizes everybody who surrounds her or she thinks mean things about them, even her friends. For example, she compares one of her friends to a mouse because she’s small and quiet. That didn’t sit well with me, especially since Clara thinks that she’s perfect and she doesn’t grow as a character or realize that the way she thinks is wrong.

Clara has a best friend called Bradley and she constantly says that he’s quiet and shy. The first time this was said and the first time the gameshow was mentioned, I thought we would have them both fight because they were both competing. It went sort of like that since at first Bradley’s mom’s boyfriend is the person who makes him compete, but then once they’re both in the gameshow, the contestants (Clara included) start pulling pranks on each other and basically cheating to make the other one lose. This, again, is never addressed and there are no repercussions against anyone.

Do you know of any middle-grade novels that feature a female main character and/or a gameshow or contest of any sort? Let me know in the comments.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

 

 

I’d Like to Stay Here

I’d Like to Stay Here

Hello and happy Wednesday. You know that I’m not really a fantasy/dystopian/anything-that-is-not-contemporary reader, but there comes a book or a series every once in a while that sweeps me of my feet and converts me, even if it is for a short time. That’s what happened when I was reading Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs. 

I read this book between March 14th and March 19th and gave it four stars. I’m sure you know that these are uncertain times in the world and saying that I read this book for escapist purposes was an understatement. I watched the movie a few months ago, but I knew that it condensed the first three books in the series or something like that, so I was expecting something different. Adaptation-wise, I think it did a good job, although I can only speak for the parts pertaining to the first book. I would like, however, to have a movie series, each focusing on one installment because some elements were lost, which is understandable but sad nonetheless. 

You know that if you add grandparents to a story, you basically got me hooked. This gave me similar vibes than My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry by Fredrik Backman, although the fantastic elements are heavier and we don’t get to see a lot of the relationship between Jacob and his grandfather. It’s more like the main character is discovering what his grandfather’s life had been like. 

If you’ve heard anything about this book, it’s probably that there are old pictures throughout it. I didn’t know there would be so many pictures; I thought we would have a few of the children at the beginning and that would be it, but no: if I’m not mistaken there are fifty pictures in just the first book. I wonder if the others have them as well. I think the author did a great job of creating a story using those old photographs. 

Something else you might have heard is that this is an analogy of World War 2 and how Jews and people who were considered different were persecuted. Well, part of the story takes place during WW2, so I don’t know if it would be considered an analogy or a juxtaposition of the true events that happened in the world, that Jacob’s grandpa, Abraham had to witness and suffer because he was a Jew, and the war against “peculiars,” that also involved him because he had a special ability of seeing monsters nobody else could see. I think if anything, it brings great commentary on how “peculiars” are still being systematically oppressed, be it for their race, religion, ability or disability, gender, sexual orientation, or pretty much whatever the heteropatriarchy deems different. 

The whole mood of this story is dark, and I felt like when reading this I was picturing an old movie in my mind that always has this opaque tone. There are a couple of violent scenes, and even when they are not, this novel is never happy. It took me a little bit longer than I had anticipated going through it, but I was satisfied with the ending. To me, the ending gives you the option to consider this a stand-alone if you don’t want to continue with the series, but if you do, it is open enough that you know something else is going to happen. That’s great for me because I detest cliffhangers. 

If you know anything about my reading tastes, then you probably know that part of the reason why I enjoyed this book was that Jacob, the main character, was introduced to the whole peculiar thing at the same time as the readers were. That is, we learn what he learns when he learns it. That is the kind of fantasy novel I am into. What I wasn’t into was the whole romantic element in this story. Seriously, I’m not even going to explain it to you because I think it is kind of yucky and totally unnecessary and that is coming from someone who basically eats romance books. 

Have you started reading any new series this year? Tell me about them in the comments below. 

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila 

 

Sun Kissed Makeup Look

Sun Kissed Makeup Look

Hello and happy Monday. I don’t usually go for warm tones, or at least not a look that is made up exclusively of them because I feel that would be a bit too much for me. Some days, though, I wake up with a weird makeup idea and I go with it. My weird makeup idea of the day is a yellow and orange look that would complement my yellow dress. What can I say? I was feeling all the hippie vibes, letting the sunshine in. For this look, I’m using the Colour Pop Good Sport palette. These are the steps I followed to achieve the look:

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Primer
  2. Concealer
  3. Foundation
  4. Powder
  5. Eyebrows
  6. High Hopes (crease)
  7. Liquid eyeshadow (eyelid)
  8. Rookie (center of the lid)
  9. Champagne eyeshadow (inner corner)
  10. Orange pencil eyeliner
  11. Mascara
  12. Contour
  13. Bronzer
  14. Blush
  15. Champagne highlighter
  16. Orange creme lipstick
  17. Orange lipgloss
  18. Setting spray

What are your thoughts on yellow and orange makeup looks? Do you like them? Let me know in the comments.

Happy Monday!

Love, Miss Camila

Getting Ready for Back to School

Getting Ready for Back to School

100th day.pngHello and happy Saturday. I’ve been really into self-care for a while, and especially when I was teaching I had to stop, assess my routines, and make a more conscious effort to dedicate some time for myself and not think about school. Part of this included my preparation before starting classes, meaning the day before students went back to school. I decided to really focus on myself and do the things I wouldn’t have the time and energy for once school started.

I began my day by staying in bed for a little longer and reading. I must say, I did incorporate reading to my everyday routine, but there’s something about staying in bed when other people are getting ready to go to work. I blogged because again, that is something I could not do while working at a school. I left my house at 6:30am and was home at 4:30pm, absolutely exhausted and more often than not taking some work I had to do for the following day.

The next part of my routine was a face mask. Now, if you’ve been here for a while, then you probably know that I didn’t like sheet masks at all, and preferred the old school ones you had to apply with a brush and either peel off or remove with water. Well, a lot has changed since then because now I’m a total fan of sheet masks.

With my face nice and hydrated, I took a shower and I washed my hair. I usually don’t wash my hair on weekdays because that adds a lot of time to my routine. I applied shampoo, conditioner, and even some argan oil to make my hair look shiny and healthy. After my shower, I went all in with a skincare regime from L’Occitane, which again, I only have time for over the weekends.

If you are a teacher, I suggest you give yourself self-care moments, in which you can really recharge and think about yourself instead of all the responsibilities that come with teaching. They will still be there after you’re done, but you’ll be relaxed and able to tackle whatever needs to be tackled.

In the comments below tell me about your favorite thing to do when it comes to self-care.

Happy teaching!

Love, Miss Camila

NetGalley Reads: The Mountains Sing (DNF)

NetGalley Reads: The Mountains Sing (DNF)

NETFLIX TALK_.pngHello and happy Friday. I know I’ve never done this, but today I’ll be talking about a book I DNF’ed, or did not finish. This book was sent to me via NetGalley because I was invited to a blog tour by Algonquin, the publishing house. Like I’ve mentioned earlier, I’ve been invited to several bog tours lately, and that’s actually the only way in which I am getting books from NetGalley now, as I am not requesting anything. Now that we got that out of the way, let’s review this.

I started reading The Mountains Sing by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai on February 1st, 2020 and did not finish it, which is why I am not going to rate it. I was excited to read and review this book because the author is Vietnamese and it made me happy that NetGalley, and especially Algonquin, was helping promote diversity in the bookish industry.

The book starts with the main character telling us about their recently deceased grandmother and the stories she would tell. That alone sounds fascinating, right? Well, every time I sat down and read, I would feel like I was not retaining anything. There are some books that require the readers to reach a certain point to get truly hooked, and I felt that I never got to that point. I mostly read at night, after long days of teaching, and for some reason, I could not focus on this story.

There are alternating perspectives and timelines, which is something I usually love, but the way it was done in this book, it went over my head. I got very confused because I wasn’t sure about who was talking or what they were talking about, and I know that I had no clue about Vietnam, but it was deeper than that, it was about the author’s narrative style that was too advanced for me.

Had I read this on vacation or during a time when I could be 100% dedicated to the story, I think I would have been able to finish it and truly value it for what it was, but this experience with it was leading me towards a three or even a two-star rating. I recognize the importance of this book, but it wasn’t for me.

I am not going to attempt to read it later, but if you are able to finish it, let me know what you thought about it.

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila