Horrible Quotes from “Counting to D”

Horrible Quotes from “Counting to D”

Alibris: Books, Music, & Movies

img_0077Hello and happy Wednesday. As promised, today I bring you another post related to Counting to D by Kate Scott. I usually link the book titles so that you can check them out on Goodreads, but since I gave this novel one star because of ableist jokes, I will not link it. I seriously wouldn’t want anybody reading this book, and I gave you a few reasons to explain this in my other post, but I think you need to see for yourselves. I collected some quotes from the first few chapters, which were either cringe-worthy or plain and simple horrible. Let’s get started, shall we?

“Arden knew me so well -way better than my stupid mother did.”

Arden is the main character’s best friend, who’s consoling her after the main character’s mom tells her she finally got a job after over a year of being unemployed, but it happens to be in a different city. Brat much?

“She spouted some garbage about how much she loves me and how we need to stick together as a family.”

This made me even angrier than the “stupid mother” comment. Girl, your mom pretty much raised you on her own and has had serious struggles because she’d been unemployed for a while, and now that she’s found a job so that you can continue to have the lifestyle you know and love, you’re being a horrible human being to her? No, sweetie, that’s not how life works. I am 25 years old, and if my mom decided to work in another city, I’d go with her, and I’d go happily.

“The other girls at our school are serious bitches. If they aren’t making fun of you for being lysdexic they’re teasing you about being an übernerd.”

These are the best friend’s encouraging words when the main character complains about moving because she won’t have any friends. If those girls actually made fun of someone for having a learning disability, then clearly they’re bad people, but calling them bitches doesn’t make you any better, either.

“I spent the period stressing about my lack of a social life instead.” 

This was her first day in a new school, and it was the first class she was taking if I’m not wrong. So it makes total sense that instead of listening to her teachers, she’s stressing about not having friends. I’m telling you, this book is a complete mess.

“These kids were smart. They’d want to be my friends, right?”

Seriously, kid, stop it. This is your first day of class and as important as it is to have friends, you should be focusing on your classes or something. Also, you can’t just assume that someone is going to want to be your friend because they look like they might be nerds.

“The problem was that my best friends were both in San Diego, and the only person I’d talked to in this town had blue hair and facial jewelry.”

The problem is that you’re a narrow-minded little brat, who is so superficial that won’t even appreciate the fact that someone wanted to approach you and talk to you. She was nice enough to start a conversation with you on your first day on class when no one else did, and you care more about how she looks? Wow, you really don’t deserve her as a friend.

“Had I just made a friend? Would survival at this school really be that easy?”

So now you’re not bothered by her looks because you consider her your friend. And I know that teenagers tend to overreact, but “surviving” a school sounds a bit too extreme, especially considering that you made a friend on your very first day. Also, give yourself some credit.

“Agradable encontrarte. Me llamo Nacho”

This is supposed to be the Spanish translation for “Nice to meet you. My name is Nacho.” Only what it really says is “Friendly to find you. My name is Nacho,” because the author most likely used Google translate. The correct way of saying it would be something like “Gusto en conocerte. Me llamo Nacho.” You might think it’s stupid, but Spanish is my first language and including it just for the sake of adding some filler to a bad plot doesn’t make any sense to me. At least make sure what is being said is accurate. Also, Nacho is not short for Nate, it’s short for Ignacio.

“I would have said he looked emo, but his jeans fit properly and his faded black hoodie could pass as baggy, so he may have just been sloppy.” 

Okay, number one, nobody really looks emo anymore, not since 2009. Number two, again with this judgemental girl. This is the second person who talks to you during the first day of school and all you are able to do is look at his clothes and make assumptions about him.

“It was my first day in this town, and I was already crushing on a snack food.”

Where do I start? Okay, yes, I know: PORTLAND IS NOT A TOWN. Now that we got that out of the way, it doesn’t bother me that she developed a crush on the guy who approached her in Spanish class because I was that girl who liked every guy who acted civilized towards me. But, was the “crushing on a snack food part” really necessary? It honestly feels like it’s there so that we’re reminded of what a big nerd the main character is.

Now I want you to help me with this last quote by sharing your thoughts in the comments below.

“I relaxed a little when I saw that the three guys sitting with her all had normal-colored hair.” 

Happy reading!

Love, Miss Camila

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