This Book Deserves Two Posts

This Book Deserves Two Posts

Alibris: Books, Music, & Movies

Hello and happy Wednesday. I was convinced this book was an ARC and I was going to launch a new series with a review, but I’ll guess that’s going to happen some other day. I don’t know how and why the book Counting to D by Kate Scott came to me, but I read it and now I’m ready to share my review with you. Let’s get started, shall we?

Like the title indicates, yes, there are going to be two posts about this book because it was so bad I decided only one wouldn’t do it justice. Today I’m going to talk about my first impressions, and then for the next post, I’m going to share a little surprise with you.

I began reading this book on March 18th and finished it on March 201th. I think this is the only good thing I have to say about this. It is a quick read, which is totally ironic given the fact that the main character has dyslexia and is illiterate (her words, not mine.)

Now that I’m using my Magical Monthly Reading Planner to write down these reviews, I am including my rating for each novel, and I’d originally given this two stars. My final rating, though, is one star because not only this novel was horrible, it was also full of ableist jokes. Basically, people were made fun of for having learning disabilities. No. Just, no. I always give authors that one extra star for effort, but Kate, you don’t deserve yours.

My general thought about the writing style is that it was clearly written by an amateur. I mean, the first page alone was all over the place, and this didn’t improve as the novel progressed. You know how I hate the “girl moving cities” thing, like seriously, that’s old news. From that first page in which the main character announces she’s moving, I could already know what was going to happen, and I’m sure you can guess it, too. This is probably why it took me just two days to read this book: it was boring and predictable. And while we’re at it, guessed what the main character did? Yes, she released a breath she didn’t realize she was holding. How could she not?

Another thing that really bothered me about this novel is that it was supposed to be a young adult novel, but the author had no idea how 15-year-olds speak nowadays. The dialogs were forced, and some expressions I’d never heard were included. It just added to the things that didn’t let me connect with this story. The main character was totally off for me, and I think if she’d been twelve instead of fifteen and this would have been marketed as a middle grade, maybe I wouldn’t have despised this so much.

Let’s start a blacklist. A list of books we don’t want anybody to read. This is obviously my candidate. Share yours in the comments below.

Happy Wednesday!

Love, Miss Camila

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s